1 Chronicles 2

1 Chronicles 2 continues the genealogy list this time picking up with the sons of Israel (Jacob).  He fathered the twelve sons who became 13 tribes of Israel, because two tribes came from Joseph (Manasseh and Ephraim).  The list is consistent with other places in scripture, with exception to the order where Dan is in a different spot on the list.  But Jacob’s sons are the foundation of the twelve tribes that we read about in much of the old testament.  These men are the patriarchs of their people.

The focus narrows in verse 3 as we dive deep into the descendants of Judah to the family of Jesse, the father of David.  The tribe of Judah receives first attention from the writer here, presumably based on the fact that it is the line of King David.  The five sons of Judah have two that receive special mention:

  1. Er, Judah’s firstborn, was evil in the sight of the Lord, and he put him to death
  2. Achan, the troubler of Israel, who broke faith in the matter of the devoted thing

Er was a bad man and lived in evil ways.  Achan was guilty of unfaithfulness to God and did not give God what was due to Him

Here is a chart that helps walk through the line from Judah to David:

David's lineage

(From Maarav, volume 10 figures @www.maarav.com)

We also learn here that four of the mighty men of David: Abishai, Joab, Asahel, and Amasa, who were made famous under their half-uncle David were born to mothers, Zeruiah and Abigail,  who were step-daughters of Jesse, born to David’s mother by her presumably earlier marriage to Nahash.  This lineage of David is obviously important as scripture devotes a lot of focus to Judah’s line and those who are part of it, even those adjacent to David’s.

Heritage matters.  Not only in scripture, but in our own life.  It impacts who we are and what we become.  The more we understand that and are able to use it as a positive influence in our personal growth and understanding, the better.  This is David’s lineage.  We’ll learn more in the next few chapters.

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