Archive for May 26th, 2012

1 Chronicles 3

1 Chronicles 3 picks up on the chronology of David.  It lists his sons – beginning with the first born Amnon.  He had quite a flock, not only of sons, but also wives.  Here is how scripture records it:

  1. Amnon, by Ahinoam the Jezreelite
  2. Daniel, by Abigail the Carmelite
  3. Absalom, whose mother was Maacah, the daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur
  4. Adonijah, whose mother was Haggith
  5. Shephatiah, by Abital
  6.  Ithream, by his wife Eglah
  7.  Shimea, Shobab, Nathan and Solomon by Bath-shua, the daughter of Ammiel
  8.  Ibhar, Elishama, Eliphelet, Nogah, Nepheg, Japhia, Elishama, Eliada, and Eliphelet, nine

There are a couple questions about the list as in the last list of nine, two names appear twice.  Speculation is that these names were given to a second child after the first passed away, which was a regular occurrence at the time.  But no matter how you cut it – David was a busy guy.  He had at least seven wives and well over a dozen sons.  Scripture tells us a bit more about him when it says “All these were David’s sons, besides the sons of the concubines, and Tamar was their sister”.   So he likely had more sons from the concubines in his life, and at least one daughter although elsewhere in scripture it sounds like there was more than one female amongst his kids.

Solomon is listed last in the list of four children with Bathsheba, even though he was actually the oldest of her sons.  And the passing of the leadership happens to Solomon – certainly not the oldest of all David’s sons – but the one chosen by God to lead and gifted to do so through his wisdom.  With nineteen sons you might expect a lot of history but going forward really only Solomon and Nathan get much ink. 

The list picks up with Solomon’s sons and proceeds.  Lots of history here, and the lineage leading to Christ continues to be painted.  David’s family is one of the most famous in all of scripture – not without plenty of drama and struggle – but so very important just the same in leading to the Savior.  God chose to give lots of attention to this family in the pages of scripture.  We would do well to ponder that impact and consider the outcome of our heritage and history on future generations as well.  How will your story read?  Who is carrying the message of the Cross in your family?  

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